DNA sequences include a gene that invites disease into the plant.  If breeders can find that gene and remove it from the DNA sequence, that plant will no longer invite disease to visit.  It all happens in the lab.  |  SV Fisk photo

CRISPR rolls along with tools breeders use

Why do some individual plants live longer in the field after others died off? Why do some individual plants yield better? Why do some naturally resist disease that destroys others? These types of questions are best exemplified by the history of rust-resistant Selkirk wheat. In 1930, Moseph McMurachy found two heads of rust-free wheat while […] Read more

The Government of Canada believes gene edited crops can help farmers produce

Canada joins support for gene editing

The federal government has come out in favour of gene editing. Or, more accurately, the Government of Canada believes gene edited crops can help farmers produce “safe and affordable food, feed, fibres, and energy in the 21st century.” The quote comes from a statement released in early November and was delivered during a World Trade […] Read more

EU’s trade future hinges on genome editing approval

KINGSTON, Ont. — The crop biotech industry will soon learn if Europe is headed into a regulatory abyss. European politicians remain hostile to genetically modified crops, and over the last few months they have considered banning glyphosate, the most popular herbicide in the world. It appears the European Union is becoming more opposed to any […] Read more