Bob Machum of Camrose, a problem wildlife specialista nd retired fish and wildlife officer  sets five beaver traps on land near Camrose, Alta.  |  Mary MacArthur photo

Burgeoning beavers build bulky barricades

CAMROSE, Alta. — Kevin MacDonald wouldn’t give a plugged nickel for the Canadian icon featured on the real nickel. This year, beavers have plugged culverts and flooded roads, fields and farmyards. “This year, it’s bonkers,” said MacDonald, manager of Camrose County’s Agricultural Service Board. The county has ripped apart roads to let the water drain […] Read more

There are mitigation measures, such as tree fencing, culvert installation and pond levellers, that can aid in producer-beaver coexistence — if producers are willing to install them.  |  Vanessa Carney photo

Is Canada’s national animal a boon or a pest?

Beavers: love them, hate them or ambivalent? A recently launched survey seeks to learn Alberta landowners’ attitudes about one of Canada’s national symbols. Alberta’s Cows and Fish society has partnered with the Miistakis Institute, a non-profit research group associated with Mount Royal University, on a survey to assess landowners’ knowledge and perception about beavers, their […] Read more

Beaver dams can slow the flow of water and cool it for fish to spawn. Sediment can also reduce the speed of water during a flood.   |  Mary MacArthur photo

Beavers can help protect waterways

Natural water management | Studies show that ponds with beaver dams had more water during periods of drought

PRIDDIS, Alta. — The beaver may be immortalized on the five-cent piece, but for many landowners, the buck-toothed rodent is not worth a plugged nickel. “Beavers often don’t have any more value than a rat in a granary,” said Reg Rempel. However, he said, the animals actually do have value. Rempel helps manage the 4,800 […] Read more