Speaking alongside former New Brunswick premier Frank McKenna at a panel during Canadian Western Agribition held in Regina Nov. 19-24, Wall said the same forces that worked to brand all Canadian oil as dirty don’t like modern agriculture.
 | Karen Briere photo

Bad labels can stick, former premier warns agriculture

Brad Wall says the forces that branded Canadian oil as dirty could easily end up doing the same with agriculture

Former Saskatchewan premier Brad Wall recently told agriculture to take a branding lesson from the energy sector. Speaking alongside former New Brunswick premier Frank McKenna at a panel during Canadian Western Agribition held in Regina Nov. 19-24, Wall said the same forces that worked to brand all Canadian oil as dirty don’t like modern agriculture. […] Read more

The grain that a farmer harvests can go east or west — there’s a bit of science that goes into deciding which one it will be.  |  Robin Booker photo

Who decides which direction grain moves?

Many variables play into how grain, shipping and railway companies determine which shipping route to take

Sometimes when you deliver grain to the elevator it’s shipped west and other times it’s shipped east. It may seem like it’s completely random but there’s a science to it that grain, shipping and railway companies do every day. This was the focus of a panel discussion entitled “Why does grain flow this way?” at […] Read more

Dairy producers and processors say they have noticed greater consumer interest in buying Canadian dairy products since controversy associated with recent trade agreements caught their attention.  |  File photo

Blue cow designation boosts Canadian dairy

Parmalat and Agropur are making greater use of the logo on products, and other dairy processors in Canada are also considering using it

CALGARY — Canada needs more blue cows. So says the Canadian dairy industry about the blue cow logo that can be affixed to domestic dairy products to inform consumers about origin. Producers and processors say they have noticed greater consumer interest in buying Canadian dairy products since controversy associated with recent trade agreements caught their […] Read more


Rural Municipalities of Alberta delegates passed a resolution that calls on the Orphan Well Association to prioritize the reclamation of abandoned oil and gas wells.  |  File photo

Alta. municipalities focus on well reclamation, cougars

Addressing predatory cougars, ensuring reclamation of oil and gas wells, enabling high-speed internet, and improving wetland restoration will all be part of the Rural Municipalities of Alberta’s advocacy efforts as it heads into 2019. Representatives of the organization passed all 24 resolutions during its recent fall convention in Edmonton. Here are some of the key […] Read more

The 1.8 metre square spider-shaped robot folds up compactly and unfurls to provide farmers with a driverless drill.  |  Small Robot Company photo

Harry the robot is ready for action planting crops

A British agritech start-up company has unveiled its latest robot for planting crops that it says will revolutionize farming. Based in Shropshire, the Small Robot Company has unveiled its digital planting robot, called Harry, and previewed an early version of its Wilma Artificial Intelligence interface. Harry is a prototype of the world’s first digital drilling […] Read more


The German government hopes that a new way to determine the sex of unhatched chicks will prove to be a major advancement in animal welfare.  |  SELEGGT photo

New method of chick gender ID hits market

It’s hoped the technique will prevent the culling of millions of unwanted male chicks after they are hatched


Millions of male chicks from laying hens are culled each year because they are considered to have no breeding or meat purposes in food production. Growing concerns voiced by consumers over animal welfare have prompted researchers and supermarkets to look into novel methods of gender identification. In Germany, 45 million male chicks from laying hens […] Read more

Tourists experience agricultural work in Tono.  |  Photo courtesy of Tono Natural Life Network

Agricultural tourism catches on in Japan

More than 100 farms in this part of the country welcome tourists who can stay overnight and experience farm work

TONO, Japan — Kotoro Kikuchi, a second-year student at Tono Ryokuho High School, came to stay at a farm Sept. 26-27 with three other boys from his school. “Today, we harvested chestnuts,” Kikuchi said. Kikuchi, 17, said he came here to experience agriculture, but he wants to be a fisherman after graduating from high school. […] Read more

A diverse amount of bacterial DNA has been found to exist in the calf’s intestine right at the moment of birth. | File photo

Calves born with intestinal bacteria: study

A diverse amount of bacterial DNA has been found to exist in the calf’s intestine right at the moment of birth

Are newborn calves born without evidence of any bacteria? One might think so, given the assumed sterile nature of its dam’s uterus. But, according to researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, a diverse amount of bacterial DNA has been found to exist in the calf’s intestine right at the moment of birth. “We are […] Read more


Speaking to municipal officials at the Rural Municipalities of Alberta fall convention in Edmonton, Notley again emphasized her support for pipeline expansion as the Canadian economy continues to lose revenue due to price discounts. | Jeremy Simes photo

Notley continues push for oil pipelines

Rural Alberta still recovering from the crash in the oil sector, but price discounting continues to take a toll on industry

Pushing for pipeline expansion and upgrading oil remain top priorities for Alberta Premier Rachel Notley as the province continues to be hammered by steep discounts to energy prices. Speaking to municipal officials at the Rural Municipalities of Alberta fall convention in Edmonton, Notley again emphasized her support for pipeline expansion as the Canadian economy continues […] Read more

Tightly managed potato supply means processors will struggle to replace the missing spuds when 4.3 percent of acres are lost.  |  File photo

Bad harvest weather causes potato shortage

Four percent of the national crop was not harvested this year, and potato processors are facing a shortfall

From Prince Edward Island to Alberta, this fall was a massive migraine for potato growers. Rain, snow and unseasonably cold weather prevented producers from digging potatoes out of the ground. As a result, about four percent of the crop was not harvested and potato processors are facing a shortfall. “This has been a very difficult […] Read more