Doing it right, doing it right, doing it right

What happens on the farm matters in international markets, so the President of Cereals Canada wants to make sure that growers pay attention to labels.

Cam Dahl said producers should follow label instructions on crop protection products and do everything they can to stay ahead of fusarium head blight.

“Whether it comes to pesticide residues or if it comes to things like mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), or orochratoxin A, there is a lot more scrutiny and countries are becoming more protectionist and very often they look to things like sanitary and phytosanitary measures to block trade,” he said.

By taking steps to manage fusarium head blight, including applying a fungicide when there is an elevated risk of the disease, growers will limit the presence of DON in their grain and protect its marketability.

When it comes to pesticide residues, Dahl said there has been no exports rejected because Canadian shipments are within the maximum residue limits (MRL).

“However, that doesn’t mean there are not market disruptions,” Dahl said.

“There are concerns in durum wheat for example. There are concerns about glyphosate in some markets. There are concerns with weed seed issue in Peru. Vietnam is currently closed because of their concerns regarding thistle seeds.”

In May, keepingitclean.ca provided an update on crop protection products of concern for the 2020 growing year:

Pulses — do not use

Glufosinate: (Western Canada) Growers are advised to not use glufosinate (MPower Good Harvest) on lentils as a crop desiccant. Lentils treated with this product will not be accepted by grain buyers. There is an elevated risk of MRL related trade disruption due to missing or very low MRLs in most major markets.

Pulses — be informed

Diquat: Peas, lentils, chickpeas, dry beans and fababeans treated with diquat (Reglone) may not be accepted by some grain buyers. MRLs are established in most major markets but are set at low levels in the U.S. Growers are advised to consult their grain buyer before use.

Glufosinate: (Eastern Canada) Dry bean growers are advised to consult with grain buyers before using glufosinate (Ignite) on dry beans in Eastern Canada. MRLs are missing or set at low levels in most major markets.

Glyphosate: Peas, lentils, chickpeas, dry beans and fababeans may not be accepted if treated with pre-harvest glyphosate (Roundup) due to scrutiny in the global marketplace and low MRLs for some pulse crops in certain export markets. Growers are advised to consult their grain buyer before use.

Cereals — do not use

Glyphosate: Malt barley will not be accepted by grain buyers if treated with pre-harvest glyphosate. Do not use glyphosate on malt barley.

Saflufenacil: Malt barley will not be accepted by grain buyers if treated with saflufenacil (Kixor, Heat). Do not use saflufenacil on malt barley.

Cereals — be informed

Chlormequat: Before using chlormequat (Manipulator) on malt barley, growers are advised to check with their grain buyer to confirm contract obligations and acceptance.

Glyphosate: Only use pre-harvest glyphosate on barley and wheat once the least mature part of the field is at less than 30 percent grain moisture.

Oats may not be accepted if treated with pre-harvest glyphosate; growers are advised to consult their grain buyer before use. Where permitted, ensure the least mature part of the field is at less than 30 percent grain moisture before applying pre-harvest glyphosate.

Canola — There are no market concerns with products registered for use on canola.

2020 Update: Canola can be treated with metconazole (Quash) and quinclorac (Clever, Facet and Masterline Quinclorac).

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