These special recipes help create a celebration for Mom

For those looking for recipes to impress Mom for Mother’s Day, pork tenderloin with Dijon Marsala sauce is a good option for its five-star restaurant flavour.

Add duchess potatoes, a marinated salad, steamed broccoli or spring asparagus and a chocolate cookie for dessert. All can be completely or partially prepared ahead of time.

Pork tenderloin with Dijon Marsala sauce

The sauce is also excellent served over other cuts of meat or vegetables. Serves four to six people.

  • 2 pork tenderloins 1.5-2 kg
  • 1 tbsp. coconut oil or vegetable oil 15 mL
  • 1/4 c. Dijon mustard 60 mL
  • 2 tbsp. butter 30 mL
  • 4-5 mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tbsp. butter 15 mL
  • 1 tbsp. flour 15 ml
  • 1/2 c. dry Marsala wine 125 mL
  • 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard 15 mL
  • 1 c. sour cream 250 mL
  • salt and pepper to taste

Rub meat with first amount of Dijon mustard, place meat in a sealable plastic bag and refrigerate for at least six hours or overnight.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat, add pork tenderloins and turn to evenly sear all sides.

Preheat oven to 350 F (180 C). Oil a 9×13 inch (22 x 33 cm) baking dish. Transfer meat to baking dish.

Bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Turn and continue cooking for 10 to 15 minutes, or to desired doneness, when internal temperature reaches 160 F (72 C).

Remove from oven, transfer meat to a platter, cover with foil and rest for 10 minutes.

In the same pan meat was seared in, melt butter over medium heat, add mushrooms, stir and cook until just beginning to brown, add onions and garlic, stir and cook until soft, lower heat to avoid browning.

Remove to a dish and set aside. Add flour to remaining butter and juices in pan, stir to mix and release meat and vegetable bits from pan.

Add Marsala wine, mustard, and sour cream. Stir and cook until sauce has thickened.

Add onions, garlic, mushrooms and any meat juices from roasting pan, season with salt and pepper to taste.

Stir and reduce heat to keep warm while meat is carved.

Carve pork into thick slices and place on a serving dish. Spoon sauce over meat and serve.

Here’s a make ahead tip: brown meat and make sauce in the morning or night before and refrigerate. Roast meat, reheat sauce and prepare vegetables for a quick meal. Adapted from www.allrecipes.com.

Duchess Potatoes

Serves six.

  • 2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and quartered 1 kg
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3 tbsp. fat-free milk 45 mL
  • 2 tbsp. butter 30 mL
  • 1 tsp. salt 5 mL
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 mL
  • 1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg .5 mL
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten

Place potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes or until tender. Drain. Over very low heat, stir potatoes one to two minutes or until steam has evaporated. Remove from heat.

Preheat oven to 400 F (200 C). Press potatoes through a potato ricer into a large bowl, or mash well. Stir in egg yolks, milk, butter, salt, pepper and nutmeg.

Using a pastry bag or heavy-duty re-sealable plastic bag and a large star tip, pipe potatoes into six mounds on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Begin by making a two-inch (five-cm) circle, continue circling to make a nice mound.

Refrigerate to chill for at least 20 minutes.

Brush with beaten egg just before baking.

Put in oven with pork tenderloin when meat is turned. When meat is removed turn oven up to 400 F (200 C) bake 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown. Serve immediately. Adapted from www.tasteofhome.com.

Mardi Gras picnic salad

Serves 20 people, 1/2 cup (125 mL) per serving.

This salad is great for a potluck or picnic. It stores well in an airtight container in refrigerator for up to one week.

  • 4 c. cucumber, peeled if desired, slice 1/4 inch (65 mm) thick 1 L
  • 2 c. cauliflower cut into bite-size pieces 500 mL
  • 1 c. onion, chopped 250 mL
  • 1 c. celery, sliced 250 mL
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • 2 tsp. coarse salt 10 mL

Dressing:

  • 1 c. granulated sugar 250 mL
  • 3/4 c. white vinegar 175 mL
  • 1 tbsp. yellow mustard seed 15 mL
  • 1/2 tsp. celery seed 2 mL
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

In a large bowl, combine cucumber, cauliflower, onion, celery and peppers. Sprinkle with salt and toss or stir well.

Let sit two hours and drain well.

For dressing, combine in a glass bowl sugar, vinegar, mustard seed, celery seed and garlic. Stir well. Microwave on high for two minutes, stir to dissolve sugar, and let cool.

Combine salad and dressing in a 12 cup (three-litre) sealable container. Seal with lid then shake a few times, refrigerate until serving.

Adapted from Mustard Makeovers & More; 100 Marvellous Recipes for Busy Families.

Flourless fudge cookies

These are thin chocolate cookies with crisp edges and fudgy middles. For a special dessert serve with sliced strawberries, raspberries and/or blueberries. Makes about 34 cookies.

  • 3 c. icing sugar 750 mL
  • 3/4 c. unsweetened cocoa powder 175 mL
  • 1/4 tsp. salt 1 mL
  • 3-4 large egg whites, lightly beaten (see note)
  • 1 tbsp. pure vanilla extract 15 mL
  • 1/2 c. semi-sweet mini chocolate chips 125 mL

Preheat oven to 350 F (180 C).

Line two baking sheets with silicone baking mats or with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, whisk together icing sugar, cocoa powder and salt.

Whisk vanilla and egg whites. Add to sugar mixture and stir just until batter is moistened. Stir in chocolate chips. Batter should be thick.

Scoop batter with teaspoon onto baking sheets. Leave about 2 1/2 inch (six centimetres) of space between each cookie, make 34 cookies.

Bake eight to 10 minutes, or until the tops are glossy and lightly cracked.

Let cookies completely cool on baking sheet and store in an airtight container for up to three days.

Note: Begin with three egg whites and add the fourth egg white, or part of it, if needed. Adapted from www.ihearteating.com.

Betty Ann Deobald is a home economist from Rosetown, Sask., and a member of Team Resources. Contact: team@producer.com.

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