Saskatchewan crop roughly 80 percent seeded — report

WINNIPEG, June 1 (CNS) – Farmers in Saskatchewan have planted about 81 percent of this year’s crop, according to the provincial crop report. That is slightly behind the five-year pace of 82 percent.

The report covers the week to May 29.

The southeast corner of the province is the farthest along and the northeast is the farthest behind.

• The southeast has 95 percent seeded. Minimal rains in the area helped farmers make good progress during the week, however winds are now drying soil, the report said. Emergence has also been delayed due to cool weather and dry fields.

• The southwest corner has also seen good progress with 94 percent of the crop planted. According to the report, emerged crops are in fair-to-excellent condition, but emergence has been delayed in many areas by the cool weather and dry field conditions. Most of the crop damage this past week was caused by frost, lack of moisture and strong winds.

• The east-central and west-central regions are both about 80 percent seeded. Varying amounts of rainfall were reported in each region with cool temperatures slowing emergence in some places. Some more warm weather is needed to dry things up. Producers in the east-central area can expect to wrap up seeding operations in the coming weeks if field conditions remain ideal. However, the report indicates the west-central region could need a week or two after that.

• Northeast Saskatchewan is the farthest behind with only 43 percent of the crop seeded. That is well behind the five-year average of 80 percent. Some producers have not turned a wheel on their machinery due to the soggy conditions, the report said. A large number of acres will likely be left unseeded in the northeast.

• In the northwest, producers have seeded 76 percent of the crop. That is behind the five-year average of 85 percent. Crops are slowly emerging and are in fair-to-excellent condition. There are reports of farmers burning residue and unsalvageable crops, according to the report.

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