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No-till EU farmers brace for glyphosate ban

LONDON, Ont. — A pioneer in British no-till farming says there’s a good chance European farmers will lose access to glyphosate. “It’s a French and German thing,” Tom Sewell said at the recent Innovative Farmers Association of Ontario conference in London. The politics of those two countries means there is pressure to ban the herbicide,[...]

Roundup report penned by Monsanto ghostwriter: lawsuit

(Reuters) — Monsanto employees ghostwrote scientific reports that U.S. regulators relied on to determine that a chemical in Roundup does not cause cancer, farmers and others suing the company claimed in court filings. 
The documents, which were made public March 14, are part of a mass litigation in federal court in San Francisco claiming Monsanto[...]

Glyphosate not carcinogenic: EU scientists

HELSINKI, Finland (Reuters) — Glyphosate should not be classified as a substance causing cancer, the European Chemical Agency concluded last week. Contradictory findings on carcinogenic risks have thrust the chemical into the centre of a dispute between EU and U.S. politicians, regulators and researchers. “This conclusion was based both on the human evidence and the[...]

CFIA report to weigh in on glyphosate debate

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is about to release a report that could change the public perception of glyphosate. Since 2015, CFIA scientists have been testing food for residues of glyphosate, a product best known by the Roundup brand name, although other brands and generic exist. It is the most popular herbicide in the world.[...]

EU chemical agency says weed killer glyphosate not carcinogenic

By Jussi Rosendahl and Tuomas Forsell HELSINKI, March 15 (Reuters) - Glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup herbicide, should not be classified as a substance causing cancer, the European Chemical Agency concluded on Wednesday, potentially paving the way for its licence renewal in the EU. A transatlantic row over possible risks to human health[...]

Glyphosate presence in honey raises concerns

For years, environmentalists have said insecticides must be banned to protect bees. Now, some of those same environmental groups are saying that glyphosate must be banned to protect consumers from tainted honey. Last fall, the U.S. Organic Consumers Association and Beyond Pesticides filed a lawsuit against Sue Bee Honey of Sioux City, Iowa, because its[...]

With new crops come new weeds, warns U.S. scientist

Andrew Kniss has created a map that jumps off the page. Kniss, a University of Wyoming weed scientist, tweeted out a map this winter that shows the states with palmer amaranth. The weed has destroyed the livelihoods of farmers in Arkansas and is gaining a foothold in the U.S. Midwest. The map shows that palmer[...]

New hurdle for soybean herbicide

A new herbicide tolerant system for soybean growers is facing further delays.
Balance GT soybeans recently received import approval from China, which was the last key importer to approve the trait.
However, the system can’t be introduced until the Balance Bean herbicide receives regulatory approval in the United States.
The original goal was to launch the new system[...]

Sugar industry fears proposed NAFTA change could hurt exports

TABER, Alta. — Potential trade negotiations with the administration of United States President Donald Trump could affect Canada’s sugar business. Though small in the global scheme of sugar production, which comes mostly from cane, Canada’s sugar trade also involves the southern Alberta sugar beet industry. Canada’s access to the United States under existing rules comprises[...]

What do Chinese wheat buyers want?

EDMONTON — China likes Canadian wheat, a lot. Sean Linstead is in a good position to comment on what China wants when it comes to wheat. As a Vancouver-based trader for of COFCO, the China National Cereals, Oils and Foodstuffs Corp., he sources wheat for the giant state buyer. And premium hard red spring wheat[...]

Minnesota investigates origin of Palmer amaranth weed on conservation land

CHICAGO, Feb 7 (Reuters) - Minnesota has launched an investigation to find the source of seed mixes contaminated with weed seeds after the aggressive, herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth weed was found on 30 areas planted in a federal conservation program. The weed grows very fast, reaching up to eight feet in height and can hold back[...]

What does China want? Great hard red spring wheat

EDMONTON — China likes Canadian wheat, a lot. Sean Linstead is in a good position to comment on what China wants when it comes to wheat. As a Vancouver-based trader for of COFCO, the China National Cereals, Oils and Foodstuffs Corp., he sources wheat for the giant state buyer. And premium hard red spring wheat[...]

It might be a good time to stock up on glyphosate

Glyphosate prices are on the rise because of production problems in China. The average price of technical grade glyphosate in China fell to US$2,878 per tonne in 2016, the lowest level in three years, according to an analysis by CCM Data & Business Intelligence, a market intelligence provider for China’s agriculture, chemicals, food and life[...]

Blame it on the ducks

Waterhemp was found in a soybean field southeast of Winnipeg last fall, more than 75 kilometres from the U.S. border. It was the first discovery of waterhemp in Manitoba and likely in Western Canada. Now that it’s arrived, weed scientists are wondering how this happened. How did waterhemp, a pigweed common to the U.S. Midwest,[...]

How to stop weeds from getting a head start

It’s never too early to start planning for spring seeding, and that’s especially true this year after the wet harvest across most of the Prairies. Wet soils will mean more problems getting the crop in, and some additional weed control challenges afterward. One will be volunteer canola. “The length of time many canola crops were[...]