From the Archives: Lake named but Diefenbaker sticks

The Western Producer takes a weekly look at some of the stories that made headlines in issues of the paper from 75, 50, 25 and 10 years ago.

75 years ago: June 12, 1941

The Saskatchewan Co-operative Wholesale Society reported record sales of $2.23 million for 1940, up from $1.5 million the previous year. Trading profit increased to $74,089.61 from $62,795.39. The greatest increase in business was the sale of petroleum products, which was up 100 percent.

Walter Haskins, a prominent British Columbia farm leader, was appointed secretary-treasurer of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture. The federation also planned to open a national office in Ottawa, where Haskins would work full time. Haskins replaced George Coote, who was a member of the Alberta Wheat Pool board and a director of the Bank of Canada.

Note the new dust control equipment that had recently been installed on Saskatchewan Wheat Pool’s grain terminal in Vancouver. The photo, which was taken from the deck of a loading grain ship, was taken in the summer of 1978.  |  File photo

Note the new dust control equipment that had recently been installed on Saskatchewan Wheat Pool’s grain terminal in Vancouver. The photo, which was taken from the deck of a loading grain ship, was taken in the summer of 1978. | File photo

50 years ago: June 9, 1966

Saskatchewan natural resources minister John Cuelenaere announced that the 430 sq. kilometre reservoir that had formed behind the new dam on the South Sask-atchewan River would officially be called Lake Saskatchewan. The name didn’t stick, however, and the reservoir is known today as Lake Diefenbaker.

Federal agriculture minister J.J. Greene expressed his preference for the Canadian Wheat Board to be part of the agriculture department rather than the finance department. The board had once been under agriculture but had moved to trade and commerce and then to finance when Mitchell Sharp changed portfolios. Greene recognized that the finance minister knew more about the wheat board than he did but felt it made more sense for all things agriculture to be under the same roof.

25 years ago: June 13, 1991

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Vancouver grain terminals locked out their workers in a dispute over hours of work. The move threw a monkey wrench into the wheat board’s heavy export program.

The CFA was not happy to learn that some of the more than $120,000 that the federal Progressive Conservative government gave the Consumers’ Association of Canada so that it could take part in a food policy review was used to conduct an anti-supply management study.

10 years ago: June 8, 2006

The arrest of 17 Toronto men charged with terrorism-related offences was expected to expedite proposed new regulations governing the sale of ammonium nitrate fertilizer. “I would think it will have a little higher profile than a week ago,” said Chris Watson, chief inspector of explosives with Natural Resources Canada.

Lightning struck a herd of cattle near Carnduff, Sask., killing 13 animals, including a champion Tarentaise from Canadian Western Agribition.

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